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> Flounder Fishing, chum
jaybird
post Jul 28 2004, 10:32 AM
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Have any of you experienced flounder fishermen ever used or heard of anyone using chum for these fish? I am really wanting to try targeting this fish. Anyone willing to offer any advice of any kind for catching these fish, thank you.
jaybird
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Guest_kpspeckcatcher_*
post Jul 28 2004, 10:58 AM
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Yes I have heard of chumming for flounder, but all the articles I have found on it are for chumming up in the Northeast, for winter flounder. I'm not sure if it would work the same for the Georgia coast. I have personnally never heard of anyone doing it down south, but that doesn't always mean its never been done.
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Guest_Poor Cracker_*
post Jul 28 2004, 10:58 AM
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Jaybird,

I have never tried using chum when flounder fishing. I never anchor in one spot for flounder. I have found myself to catch larger fish when trolling.
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NickN
post Jul 28 2004, 11:29 AM
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Hey Cracker....

When you say trolling, do you mean easing along with your trolling motor and fishing the area? And do you use a float? or a Carolina rig?

I seem to have my best luck fishing for them in an eddy area behind an oyster rake where the current from the rising tide is moving baitfish around. Sometimes I catch them in less than 6 inches of water during the first 2 hours of an incoming tide. But I love flounder and am trying to learn new and better ways of catching them.


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Guest_gotta nuddn_*
post Jul 28 2004, 11:32 AM
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Poor Cracker,

I have read about trolling for flounder. Do you mind describing your tactics. Depth, tide, bottom type, rig, trolling speed. outboard or trolling motor.

Thanks
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Guest_JenEric_*
post Jul 30 2004, 05:08 AM
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http://www.scottsbt.com/tacklebox/articles...interflound.htm

http://www.discovertheoutdoors.com/swfishi...p?articleid=598


JayBird. Check out these links they have some info on Flounder and chum. Hereís another tip, come to Murrells Inlet as soon as you can check out this link too, http://nl.newsbank.com/nojavascript.html

No one has ever seen anything like this. Itís sort of a flounder run or migration or something but even the pier fishermen are taking their limit.

I like to use simple rigs for them, Ĺ oz egg of flat sinker 2ft before as small a swivel as will work and an Owner hook sized for your bait. I like live finger mullet 3 to 5 inches long as it tends to keep undersized fish off my line. Speaking of which I like Spider Line Fusion 8lb. Itís real thin hard to see and stands up pretty well to the oyster beds. I was fishing on a 12í Colman Jon boat with a 1956 Evinrude 5.5 fisherman. One trick I do know is that Flounder try to face into the current so you want to be moving in the same direction as the water. I drift allot and if your boat is small enough I recommend getting a kayak paddle, they are great for maneuvering when your drifting with the current through narrow creeks.

Hope it helps.
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jaybird
post Jul 30 2004, 08:15 AM
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JE,
Thanks for the info. I have either heard or read about using corn based chum before, but I have yet to try it. I am thinking of trying a shrimp and pogie chum with corn mixed in. Maybe the wife will allow me to fish this weekend. If so, I plan to give it a try.
For some reason I couldn't access the third link.
jaybird
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NickN
post Jul 30 2004, 08:24 AM
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Thanks, JE,

I could not open the last link either. Kept getting a message that said my javascript is not enabled, but it is enabled. I appreciate all ideas on flounder, my favorite fried fish!


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61 years of fishing! And all of them enjoyable!
16' Javelin Bass Bote! 14' Jon bote :) Fishin Georgia, Arkansas, Florida, and Missouri too!
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Guest_JenEric_*
post Jul 30 2004, 08:27 AM
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Here is the story in the "Sun News" That the 3rd link went to.


Grand Strand flounder frenzy still a mystery


The catches of flounder from Grand Strand piers have gone from unbelievable to simply good this week, and there's no definite answer on the horizon for why the fish were caught in such large numbers for almost two weeks.

The amazing catches, in which hundreds of flounder were landed daily on piers from Garden City to the northern end of Myrtle Beach, began slowing down last weekend.

Overall, flounder catches off the piers are currently a little above average. However, both the Surfside Pier and The Pier at Garden City reported very good catches of flounder on Wednesday and Thursday.

"I weighed in a 6-pound, 11-ounce [flounder] about an hour ago," said Doug Skipper of Surfside Pier Thursday afternoon. "Most people are catching eight [flounder] or above. Monday and Tuesday was slower but [Wednesday and Thursday] they started catching them again in large quantities. But it's nowhere close to what last week was."

Questions still remain. Why were so many flounder concentrated so close to the surf along that stretch of beach? What was the cause of the small fish kill at Huntington Beach State Park about a week and a half ago?

The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has been and is still investigating possible causes.

"We have had employees in the general area last week and early this week taking water samples and samples of fish and sending them off for analysis," said DNR spokesman Charles Farmer.

So far, DNR staff has discovered only one unusual circumstance through testing.

"The one thing we know for certain is we have recorded some very low dissolved oxygen in the water in that area and we do have a lot of flounder in the area," Farmer said. "We do not know if those two factors are related. We do not have any reason to believe they are related but we are looking at that possibility. It could just be a situation we had a very good population of flounder this year."

There are several possible reasons for the low dissolved oxygen, but again, DNR hasn't been able to pinpoint the cause.

"How widespread [the dissolved oxygen is], we're not certain," said Farmer. "It's the type thing that could be here today and gone tomorrow. There are a variety of reasons why [areas of low dissolved oxygen] occur. It's hard to speculate."

Some of the possible causes of the low levels of dissolved oxygen are:

Upwelling. This is a circumstance where deeper colder water is pushed to shallower water near the coast, usually by persistent winds or currents.

"That's one thing we're looking at, the concept of deep, cold water welling up, but it's going to be hard to document," said Farmer.

Water temperature readings near the beach along the Grand Strand have been fairly close to normal over the last month, albeit a little cool.

Algal bloom. DNR has received reports of discolored water near where the fish kill occurred.

"We have not ruled it out but we have not seen any evidence of any algal [bloom] situation," Farmer said. "We're still waiting on water samples and fish samples. We've seen nothing the public should be alarmed with."

It's still been a week of some unusual catches and sightings along the Grand Strand, however.

Steve Armstrong and Randy Cox of Little River spotted a manatee while flounder fishing well inside the jetties at Little River.

Jack crevalle, not often seen in area estuaries, were observed chasing bait at the docks at Marlin Quay Marina in Murrells Inlet Wednesday evening.

There have been more unusual catches off area piers including guitarfish, ribbonfish and a large number of puffers (blowfish).

On a sadder note, a dead green sea turtle was spotted floating a few 100 yards off the beach at Huntington Beach State Park on Monday, although this occurrence is not considered unusual.

With all the strange happenings of late, most long-time residents believe something out of the ordinary is going on in the marine environment along the coast, and we all are itching for an answer.

However, this may very well be a case where no news, or no answer, is good news.
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jaybird
post Jul 30 2004, 10:08 AM
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I think I could tolerate a small fish kill here for a flounder bite like that. I have been fishing on days when I may have caught 8 to 10 flounder but they are always caught while trout fishing. I have never been out to specifically target flounder. This is definitely a fish that I want to learn more about and hopefully be able to successfully pursue.
Thanks for the info JE, much appreciated.

Kpspeckcatcher, can you remember what magazine and time of year you read that article. I would like to find it if I can. Thanks.

To all, have a great weekend and good luck on the water, hope to see you there.
jaybird

This post has been edited by jaybird: Jul 30 2004, 10:25 AM
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JeepShrimper
post Jul 30 2004, 11:11 AM
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So, you just drift down the creek with the rig dragging behind you? Haven't tried that. In some of the smaller creeks, I would think that the boat floating by would tend to disturb the bite behind you. How small a creek are we talking here? Haven't had any success with flounder, and I'd love to try this out.
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jaybird
post Jul 30 2004, 11:24 AM
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Jeepshrimper,
I think the noise being made in the boat is more of a factor than just the boat drifting by. That's my opinion from experience anyway. I have caught several fish right beside the boat, in times past.
Would a sea anchor or similar device be of any use in this scenario?
I'm looking for any tricks or tactics to try this weekend. That is if I can find some reason that the wife should let me go. Maybe I could tell her that if I don't run the engine some that it will freeze up. That sounds possible. Or maybe I should just be honest and tell her that I have an addiction and there is only one way to fix that. And that one thing would be to go fishing.
jaybird
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Guest_JenEric_*
post Jul 30 2004, 11:36 AM
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Here is my whole reply to JayBird Jeepshrimper


JayBird, Garden City Beach where a lot of the action is right now is about 200 miles (4hours) from you. As far as advice goes, all I do is run up one of the small creeks in our inlet and let the current pull me back down it 3 or 4 times. I use the kayak paddle to stay off the oyster bars and hold a rough course. I use 4 light/med action rods with 8í Spider Line so they are very sensitive. Two rods are almost strait up in their holders the other two are about half way down. You donít want more than 3 to 4 feet between your lines as that could allow you to go past a flounder and not put bait in its strike zone. When I get a strike I open the bail on the rod and let the line go out. I do not drop anchor or start the motor or even move that much for the most part as flounder tend to group up in favorable feeding areas and that would spook all of the fish Iím going to be going after on my next pass. I take about 10 seconds while the bail is open and aim my boat at the side of the creek with the kayak padded so it will run aground. After those 10 seconds I close the bail and set the hook. I give them the time because flounder are said to be a two strike fish, grabbing their prey first then eating it. I donít have too many problems with gut hooking undersize fish because I use big bait, finger mullet at least 4 inches or larger. Mud minnows are easier to keep alive but mullet catch more and better fish and are FREE:0)!! When I drift out of the creek and into the main channel or get to a dead end I pull all of my lines strip all of my bait alive or not and go back to the other end of the creak and follow another line down the creak making sure to pass very closely to any spots I caught fish at or had strikes on last time. Thatís it, my whole formula to a good day of flounder fishing. Personally I love Owner Hooks, I think I set more often with them but that may just be me. The only time I change this is if there is a good bend in the creek and the current is really moving around it. Then I may put a Cajun Thunder float on one of the lines anchor above the bend and let it drift with the current around the bend with the natural flow of the water. Iíll do this 5 or 6 times before I run the boat over the spot.

Good luck, if youíre ever coming up this way drop me a ďlineĒ, Jen and I are on the water almost every Sunday maybe we can ďhook-upĒ.

Eric



I have had more luck doing this than any other tactic I have used. But keep in mind, I was using a 12' jon boat and the motor is OFF. The creeks range from only 10 to 15 ft across to 40 or 50 ft. I like the smaller ones and they tend to hold the best fish. They see less fishing pressure and you donít have 200 horse power outboards blasting across the surface spooking the fish. I have caught fish like this in 3ft of water that I just drifted over. Just make sure your lines are back a good bit from the boat, go down to an 1/8oz rig if the water is shallow and keep it back 50ft or so just watch it around bends or youíll end up with a mess.


Good luck,

Eric

This post has been edited by JenEric: Jul 30 2004, 11:40 AM
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JeepShrimper
post Jul 30 2004, 11:53 AM
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Eric,
Thanks. I'll try to give it a shot. I'm not as adventurous to put that many lines out at first, and I don't have that many rod holders either. I'd be fishing from a 17 Skiff, so a little wider than the jon boat. It can still get up in those creeks though. I've got one in mind that's only about 10-20 feet wide and has several holes I've noticed on the depth-finder. The whole concept of drifting and guiding's not a new one to me. I've always done that in the fall when cast-netting the creeks for shrimp, but I've never tried it for fishing. Always thought the current might be too quick to catch something. Your tip about opening the bail is a good one. I'll let you know how it works out when I get out there next week.

Jordy
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Guest_kpspeckcatcher_*
post Jul 30 2004, 01:09 PM
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I used to fish Murrels Inlet for flounder quite a bit when I was stationed at Shaw AFB in Sumter. That was actually my first inshore saltwater fishing experience. I did not know how to throw a cast net and I had a canoe. I had bass rods and I read that flounder can be fished for alot like bass. So I stopped at a bait store there in Murrels. Bought a packet of frozen finger mullet. Hooked them on to a 1/4 oz jighead and fished those creeks in Murrels. My first time out I caught 5 flounder, all above two pounds. I was very excited to say the least. I did that for a year. After about two months I learned how to throw a net. Caught my own mullet. My #'s went up as far as catching. Took my soon to be wife once or twice. She caught a six pounder that I still have not been able to top to this day. That is one reason I do miss Murrels inlet. The flounder seemed much easier to catch than the creeks here in Georgia. I'm not sure why. The water was much more clear. That may have had something to do with it. I never did that well on the trout or reds though. In Murrels that is. But I'm beginning to figure out the flounder here in Georgia. And amen to the comment made my JenEric in regards to mullet being better than mudminnows. I do much better with mullet.

Jaybird, I will start looking for those articles on flounder chumming.
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NickN
post Jul 30 2004, 02:34 PM
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Thanks for all the info, eric. All of us flounder lovers appreciate it! I know I do! I moved to GA less than 18 months ago, and have not had much luck in GA otehr than some spots Jim Clausen showed me and one I found over in S. Carolina just north of the north jetty on the Savannah River. I recently moved to Midway, GA, and am having to learn new spots there. We also built a house, and the haouse and yard have taken up nearly all my time this spring and summer. I have only been out once since the first of the year. I have about gotten the house under control, and plan to start back fishing the coastal waters soon. I use a 16 foot bass boat and have lots of rod holders and a trolling motor. I figure I can use the trolling motor to control the boat position. Thanks for the tips!


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61 years of fishing! And all of them enjoyable!
16' Javelin Bass Bote! 14' Jon bote :) Fishin Georgia, Arkansas, Florida, and Missouri too!
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